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7 Tips For Helping Remote Employees

Working remotely is a highly sought-after job perk. Having the flexibility to live and work where you please, regardless of corporate headquarters, often draws people to take one job over another.

But while popular and convenient, the latest research from VitalSmarts shows that not everything comes up roses when working remotely. Often, “out of sight” really does mean “out of mind.”

We asked our newsletter readers what it’s like to work from home. Of the 1,153 of you who responded, 52 percent work, at least some time, from a home office. And when you do, you feel your colleagues don’t treat you equally. Specifically, remote employees feel their onsite colleagues don’t fight for their priorities, say bad things about them behind their back, make changes to projects without warning, and lobby against them with others.

When they experience these challenges, remote employees have a hard time resolving them. In fact, 84 percent say they let the concern drag on for a few days or more, while 47 percent let it drag on for a few weeks or more. And these problems don’t just affect relationships. Remote employees see larger negative impacts from these challenges than their onsite colleagues on results like productivity, costs, deadlines, morale, stress, and retention.

But since working remotely isn’t going away, how can we compensate for the toll that distance takes on relationships? According to the research, the success of remote teams hinges on the quality of communication—most importantly, the manager’s ability to communicate with both remote and onsite employees.

To identify the specific communication skills integral to co-located teams, we asked survey respondents to describe a manager who is especially good at managing remote employees. We received 853 accounts detailing specific management skills characteristic of the most successful co-located teams. Managers who use these seven skills will find that not only are their teams happier and healthier, they are also more successful.

Top 7 Skills for Managing Remote Employees
1) Frequent and Consistent Check-ins. Nearly half of respondents (46%) said the most successful managers checked in frequently and regularly with remote employees. The cadence of the check-ins varied from daily to bi-weekly to weekly but were always consistent and usually entailed a standing meeting or scheduled one-on-one.

2) Face-to-Face or Voice-to-Voice. One in four respondents said managers who insisted on some face time with remote employees were more successful. Make a visit to remote employees or schedule a mandatory in-office day once a week, month, quarter, or year. Use this time for team building. If in-person meetings are not possible, use video conferencing technology or pick up the phone to ensure colleagues occasionally see one another’s face or hear one another’s voice.

3) Exemplify Stellar Communication Skills. Respondents emphasized the importance of general, stellar communication with co-located teams. The most successful managers are good listeners, communicate trust and respect, inquire about workload and progress without micromanaging, and err on the side of over-communicating.

4) Explicit Expectations. When it comes to managing remote teams, being clear about expectations is mandatory. Managers who are direct with their expectations of both remote and onsite employees have happier teams that can deliver to those expectations. People are never left in the dark about projects, roles, deadlines, etc.

5) Always Available. Successful managers are available quickly and at all times of the day. They go above and beyond to maintain an open door policy for both remote and onsite employees—making themselves available across multiple time zones and through multiple means of technology (IM, Slack, Skype, Email, Phone, Text, etc.). Remote employees can always count on their manager to respond to pressing concerns.

6) Technology Maven. Successful managers use multiple means of communication to connect with their remote workers. They don’t just resort to phone or email, but are familiar with video conferencing technologies and a variety of services like Skype, Slack, Instant Message, Adobe Connect, and more. They often tailor their communication style and medium to each employee.

7) Prioritize Relationships. Team building and camaraderie are important for any team and co-located teams are no exception. Good managers go out of their way to form personal bonds with remote employees. They use check-in time to ask about their personal life, families, and hobbies. They allow team meeting time for “watercooler” conversation so the whole team can create personal connections and strengthen relationships.

Want to master these crucial skills? Attend one of our public training workshops in a city near you. Learn more at www.vitalsmarts.com/events.

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How to be Three Times More Productive and Valuable at Work

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Staff Drama in Healthcare Puts Patients at Risk

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Discrimination at Work

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Politics: It’s How You Disagree

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Corporate Culture Chasm: VitalSmarts Research Finds Bosses Are Out of Touch with the Day-To-Day Experiences of Their Employees

Our latest study found a concerning gap between what managers say they want their company culture to be and what employees say is really valued by these same bosses. Specifically, leaders say they want innovation, initiative, candor and teamwork, but what employees feel is really valued is obedience, predictability, deference to authority and competition with peers.

Overall, the study of more than 1,200 employees and managers, found that employees have a much more negative view of their corporate culture than their bosses. And, the more senior a person is in the organization, the more positive their perception of their company culture.

And these perception gaps matter—a lot. When employees believed that what was really valued was obedience, predictability, deference to authority and competition with peers, they were 32 percent less likely to be engaged, motivated and committed to their organization. This perception also had a dramatic impact on their performance. They were 26 percent less likely to rate their organization as successful at innovating and executing.

To see more results from our latest study, download our infographic below.

Culture Chasm Inforgraphic_071916

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Four Tips to Talk Politics – Even With Those Who Support the Candidate You Despise

Last month, we polled 1,866 of our newsletter readers and found that 9 out of 10 feel the 2016 elections are more polarizing and controversial than the 2012 elections. In fact, 1 in 3 have been attacked, insulted, or called names, and 1 in 4 have had a political discussion hurt a relationship.

The data shows most of these heated discussions take place in the following locations:
• the home (40%)
• the community (31%)
• the workplace (28%)
• on social media (26%)

And for most, talking politics is so bad that they just avoid speaking up altogether. In fact, 81% admit to avoiding political discussions at all costs; in general, people are far more restricted about who they talk politics with than they were in 2012. And the people they most avoid include coworkers (79%), strangers (70%), and neighbors (56%).

And yet, people aren’t fighting about the issues. Respondents report that many of the topics that were “hot” four years ago are no longer controversial.

In 2016, the issues people struggle to discuss include: foreign policy, gun control and terrorism. In 2012, people struggled to agree on: same-sex marriage, economic recovery, taxes, healthcare, education and the role of the government.

So if the issues aren’t lighting everyone’s fire, then it’s clear the candidates themselves are the toxic topic.

When asked to describe people who supported a candidate they didn’t like, the top ten most used adjectives included (in order): angry, uneducated, ignorant, uninformed, racist, white, narrow and blind.

However, we also probed to find formulas from those who successfully discussed politics with someone who held a dramatically different opinion. When asked what they did that worked, respondents most often used words like: agree, listen, common, open, respect, think, and ask.

By analyzing the tactics used by subjects who reported holding successful political conversations, we uncovered four tips for talking politics with others—even those voting for the candidate you despise the most.

1. Look for areas of agreement. Let the other person know you share common goals, even if your preferred tactics for achieving them differ.
2. Avoid personal attacks. While you don’t have to agree with the other person’s view, you can still acknowledge that his or her view is valid, rather than “idiotic” or “evil.”
3. Focus on facts and be tentative. Consider the source of your facts, and ask the other person to do the same. Ask two questions: Could the facts be biased? Could they be interpreted differently?
4. Look for signs of disagreement. If the other person grows quiet or starts to become defensive, reinforce your respect for him or her and remind him or her of the broader purpose you both share.

View the results of our study in the infographic below or download a copy for yourself.

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